This is my first ever #AtoZchallenge, and I was wondering what it was all about. I reached out to the literary Wikipedia (seriously, the woman has answers to every question that you throw when it comes to writing or blogging ). She gave a She gave me a brief explanation to me over a WhatsApp voice message, and I grabbed this opportunity hard and fast. This series is a walk down my memory lane, peeking into the valuable treasure chest of memories that I have collected. I hope you get to enjoy them as much as I did!
When you live in a big joint family, you have a defined set of people who discipline you and the other who pamper and spoil you big time. I am always up to some antics or the other and often fall prey for my mother's dosa karandi (Spatula used to flip dosai). It happens quite often, and every time I bawl my eyes out and rush towards my grandma.  She chides mom for beating me up and takes me for a short walk.
Our short walk usually ends near the shop at our street end. And every time, I end up with a fistful of Aasay chocolates. I think it's an integral memory every South Indian 90's kids childhood. I loved everything about that toffee and thinking back it's the perfect metaphor of my childhood. Simple, sweet, without pretence.
Everything about Aasay chocolate is fantastic, from the shiny blue wrapper that is sure many of collected and made rings, to the delicate way it melts in your mouth and the sticky feeling it leaves behind. As I grew up things around me changed and so did the chocolates. Though I look around unconsciously for a Ferrero Rocher or Bournville whenever I want to eat something sweet, the wonderful memory of Aasay lingers, like the tiny bit that remains stuck to the wrapper, that gives endless pleasure while licking it off and the aftertaste that lingers long after you've eaten it.